Vipassana Meditation – Part One: How the course benefited me:

Six months ago in frustration, I posted on Facebook to all my friends, “Does anyone know of a retreat that teaches meditation without religion that isn’t an over-priced relaxation spa?” To my surprise and delight, two acquaintances responded, “Vipassana”. That was all it took. I started researching it immediately and soon had secured 2 spots on the Vipassana meditation course in Twenty-nine Palms, CA. It’s the best thing I’ve ever done for myself.

My partner Rick and I completed the 10-day New Student course. For the first time in my years meditating and seeking some level of enlightenment, happiness and contentment, I can finally say I have found a practice that yields physical and mental results that last beyond the practice session itself. I’m truly amazed at how simple and powerful Vipassana meditation is and am recommending it to anyone and everyone that will humor my discourse on the subject. Let me tell you more…..

Vipassana Center, Twentynine Palms, CA
Vipassana Center, Twentynine Palms, CA

For myself, I have been drawn to meditation as a way to curb my fierce type A personality, filled with fire, anger, frustration and impatience. For my partner, he has been drawn to meditation to alleviate his chronic anxiety issues for which he takes a couple of different prescribed meds. In the past, various meditation practices have helped us to find clarity and peace of mind during the actual practice itself. This has been a welcomed break from the constant barrage of thoughts, emotions and psychosomatic symptoms that manifest from mental stress.

I don’t know what I expected to happen on the Vipassana course, but I’m delighted to tell you that both Rick and I experienced a level of lasting clarity, calmness and contentment through learning this practice. Our physicality has also reaped immense benefits from it. Rick hasn’t needed to take his prescribed meds since coming off them on the course. He’s also stopped biting his nails, which he has done for about 30 years incessantly. His mind is clearer than ever. I am so much calmer than before, so much so, that a stress hump between my shoulder blades has almost disappeared. We’re working more efficiently than before, with much more focus, and we are enjoying our free time with more presence, making every moment much more intense and vivid.

The course gives guidelines to practice after leaving the center, and we’re trying hard to incorporate the recommended hour in the morning and hour in the evening every day to maintain the benefits and progress even further with our practice.

We have both had huge revelations about various issues in our lives that manifested during our time at the center. According to the practice, these are called Sankharas and are deeply carved scars that cause aversion or attachment. These lead to unwanted emotions that cause pain and suffering. Through Vipassana practice, these issues come to light for each individual and one is able to subjectively deal with them. It seems that for Rick and I, our most prevalent issues surfaced incredibly fast and resolved themselves, lifting a weight from our shoulders. Through deeper and consistent practice, other sankharas continue to present themselves from the depths of our psyches. Clearing all one’s sankharas is part of the goal of the practice, since one cannot become enlightened if one still has aversions and attachments or cravings.

S.N.Goenka
S.N.Goenka

Vipassana new students HAVE to take a 10-day course to begin practicing. It’s like bootcamp, a crash course or as Goenka, the teacher calls it, “Vipassana Kindergarten”. One can only really get the benefits from immersion in this way. After you have done the 10-day course, you’re allowed to take 1 day, 2-day, or even 40-day courses if you wish. There are also meditation groups and workshops, but without the basic understanding you get from the 10-day course, it would be difficult to get any benefit from just these sessions alone.

I can only equate the experience to something like visiting the Grand Canyon for the first time. You’ve seen pictures, you’ve read the details about how vast it is, and you’ve watched footage of aircraft flying around its immense depths… but there’s nothing like walking up to the edge yourself and seeing it with your own eyes. I remember seeing it for the first time and thinking “Wow, I knew it was going to be big, but crap, I didn’t realize just how immense it would be now that I’m here looking at it.”

I’ve read many books on meditation, I’ve practiced under various masters and gurus who claim to have some level of enlightenment and wisdom to offer me. But I always felt that there was a level of mysticism involved in enlightenment that made it somewhat unattainable and magical. All of the tools that I was given to help me meditate became automated processes that I went through in hopes that somehow, one day, the light of wisdom would eventually pierce through the veil of emotions and thoughts that plagued my mind. With Vipassana, by the fifth day of the course, without any mysticism, only practical and tangible instructions, I started feeling incredibly in tune with my body and emotions. Deep issues started to surface. With help from my teacher and understanding of the practice I was able to work through and address them. I had many “oh wow” moments like this. Moments when everything suddenly seemed to make sense, and I finally thought to myself “So THIS is how it’s supposed to feel”. I finally understood through experience.

I also know now that this is why it is so important to commit fully to the course and the strict rules of which I will go into in Part 2 of my report. Without full commitment, you can’t experience that “Wow” moment where everything clicks and you finally understand the goal and the way to get there.

I highly recommend checking out the links I’ve provided in this post that give you more information about Vipassana and the location I went to. The organization has many venues where you can take the course, all over the world. Check it out for a location near you.

Author: Amanda

Amanda Turner has worked in fitness for over 20yrs, specialising in Personal Training, Competitive Fitness Training, Dance, Acrobatics, Arthirtis Mobility, Pilates, Yoga, Martial Arts and Tai Chi. She used to work full time in entertainment and fitness, but now has a design company and continues her love of fitness part time.

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