Vipassana Meditation – Part Three: The course at SCVC & my experience there:

The Facility:

The SCVC is situated close to Joshua Tree National Park. It’s extremely hot and dry in the summer and gets a little chilly in the winter months. Students are encouraged to dress in layers, and bring warmer clothes in the winter, even though it’s in California. The desert nights can get quite cold.

I was pleasantly surprised by the standard of the quarters at this facility. I had expected a very basic level of quality, knowing that the center is 100% funded on the charity of past students. Clearly their generosity and gratitude towards the center is huge. The center has high quality amenities including many individual private quarters with built in bathrooms. Some quarters were shared dormitories, but these were also more than adequate. Everything has been thoroughly thought out to give you the best experience. I’m not saying it’s a 5 star hotel. But what you get is exactly what you need to be distraction free and focused on your task. There are noise free toilet lids, soft closing door mechanisms, separate air conditioning for each room so you can control the temperature for your own comfort at all times. Cushions, mats and blocks are provided for meditation in the main meditation hall, but you can use your own if you wish. The main hall would get cold during group meditations. Many of us would bring sweaters and shawls to wrap up in, as well as socks, then remove them all after sessions.

Men's Quarters at SCVC
Men’s Quarters at SCVC

There’s a ¼ mile nature trail on each of the men and women’s sides of the center and walking it is encouraged during rest periods. The trail is full of protected nature. Exercising is not permitted on the course, so stretching one’s legs on the trail is almost a necessary contrast to the hours of sitting in meditation. The animals on the trail are incredibly friendly and not threatened by humans. Rabbits, snakes, chip monks, lizards will all walk with you fearlessly. Doves and bats have made their homes in the roofs and trees around the residences. It’s a refreshing change to see untamed wildlife living so care free around humans.

SCVC Kitchen
SCVC Kitchen

The food was pretty good and a lot of options were provided, all vegetarian. I prefer to eat a vegan diet, and there was always plenty for me to choose from. Meals containing dairy, nuts and gluten were labelled. I was able to avoid wheat and dairy the entire time without feeling hungry or malnourished. Meals included Lasagna, kitcheree, burritos, noodles, tofu steaks, cake desserts, soups, stews, curry and every day there was a salad bar, breads, cereals, fruit and a large selection of soft beverages to choose from.

Difficulties during the course:

It is apparently normal for at least one person to give up and leave the course. Our course was no exception. Someone left on Day 2. Many others became overwhelmed at various stages throughout the course, packing their bags and trying to leave, only to be talked out of it by the teachers.

My partner Rick reports that he really wanted to leave on Day 2, but found the muster to suck it up and get through it. By day 4 the benefits he was getting stopped any further thoughts of leaving early.

For me, I didn’t feel the urge to pack up and leave, but I did have trouble on numerous occasions mustering enough enthusiasm to drag myself to each of the group meditation sessions. Day dreaming, and wandering thoughts, not to mention falling asleep at times made it challenging and frustrating.

Our schedule everyday looked like this:

  • 4am Wake up bell
  • 30-6.30am Meditate in hall or in room
  • 30-8am Breakfast
  • 8-9am Group meditation
  • 9-11am Meditate in hall or room according to teacher’s instructions
  • 11-12pm Lunch
  • 12-1pm Rest
  • 1-2.30pm Meditate in hall or room and/or teacher’s interviews
  • 30-3.30pm Group Meditation
  • 30-5pm Meditate in hall or room according to teacher’s instructions
  • 5-6pm Tea
  • 6-7pm Group Meditation
  • 7-8.15pm Teacher’s discourse
  • 15-9pm Group Meditation
  • 9-9.30pm Group Meditation and questions
  • 30-10pm Rest and lights out.

That adds up to over 100 hours of meditation. By the 5th day, it was encouraged to practice “noble stillness” during group meditation, meaning trying your hardest not to move an inch during the sessions, working through discomfort using the tools given to us. By around Day 4, most people were aching all over and having trouble sitting in any position at all. The Day 5 rule really helped create focus and by day 6 almost everyone was practicing in complete stillness.

I have been nursing a Psoas injury that was making sitting on a floor mat particularly painful. There were others like me with pre-existing injuries. We were allowed to sit in a chair as needed. I had to be mindful not to use the chair at the first signs of discomfort and only use it when my injury became unmanageable.

Another difficulty came with withdrawal symptoms for reading, writing and media. I found myself reading the back of my Vitamin D bottle, curiously interested in where it was from and anything else it said in small print.

Being left with one’s own thoughts is a daunting experience. I equate it to solitary confinement of sorts…but with guidance on how to best get to know your own mind. Some days I would sit and cry during rest times, through sadness, frustration, and sometimes through happiness. It was definitely a very emotional journey, full of self-reflection, self-realization and self-discipline.

My most profound experience came around Day 4. Our meditation mats in the hall were close to one another, and rules as they were, we were not allowed to touch anyone else. So everyone carefully stepped over everyone else’s mats to get to theirs, and stretched themselves out around each other’s spaces to get comfortable as needed. Nursing my injured joint, I would stretch my leg out a lot in front of me to avoid exacerbating my injury. The girl sitting in front of me would knock my foot, reach back and grab it from time to time while adjusting herself and almost stood on me numerous times. I started to become sensitive to this behavior, getting mad at her for trying to hurt me, and in my head purposely trying to make me feel like I was being an inconvenience to her, despite her having plenty of room. In the 3 days that this happened, I became more and more annoyed by her behavior, calling her names in my head, making up stories about where she came from and what an awful person she was. During meditation I started imagining scenarios where I could call her out on her about her behavior.

It was around this time that my hip joint was getting especially painful and I had asked for a chair. Despite getting my chair, I still wanted to sit on my mat when I could, but developed an aversion to sitting behind this girl. I really didn’t want to be anywhere near her. I started feeling like she was causing me to not get any benefits out of my time meditating. I became very frustrated that my mind could only think about what was going on between us. I got so angry that those thoughts started to become violent, and with no other outlet, verbal or otherwise, I started day dreaming about punching her in the throat UFC style. My thoughts had grown wildly out of control and I felt I wasn’t getting anything at all out of the course, rather regressing. I went to my teacher to ask to be moved to avoid the distraction and find focus since my violent thoughts were starting to disturb me. My teacher smiled and said “no”. My descriptions of violence and anger didn’t faze her at all. She explained that it was perfectly normal and expected to start having these types of thoughts. That this was one of my sankharas surfacing. She told me that I needed to stay sitting behind her and work through my sankhara to understand it. She also commented that this girl and myself would probably end up being best friends by the time we left the course.

I went away and contemplated this discussion, slightly peeved that I hadn’t gotten my way. That evening, Goenka (who teaches via video in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ban Khin, having died some years ago) started talking about these types of thoughts and sankharas and what they meant. Every evening his discourse was so profound to me, that it was like he was reading my mind…. But truthfully, this fact speaks volumes about the structure of the course and the predictable nature of the mind. In essence it’s a scientific method of understanding and controlling one’s mental faculties. But I digress. Geonka’s explanation described everything that had been going on in my head with this situation. I retired for the evening realizing that I had created this situation and manifested conflict, anger and upset in myself without cause. That I had been doing this with so many things in my life that my stress levels had become intensely high for no good reason. So many of my worries and conflicts were unnecessary and only hurt myself, no one else.

The next morning during group meditation, I changed my thinking. I used my new found knowledge to step away from my emotions about my situation and see things as they were. I realized that the girl in front of me was having a really hard time sitting still and focusing. She would fidget a lot and move around in frustration. She couldn’t get comfortable no matter what she did. I realized that what I had perceived as animosity was actually just frustration. All the anger that I had developed melted away. Half way through the day, she grabbed a kneeling bench and was precariously trying to balance it on her foam floor mat in her space so that she could sit on it. It was really unstable. She started trying to shift her mat forward, encroaching on the space of the girl in front of her, seemingly because she knew I used the space behind her for my outreached leg. In this moment, I broke my vow of non-communication momentarily for the sake of her comfort. I reached forward and grabbed the kneeling bench and put it over my foot, behind her mat, where it could sit on the sturdy floor. I looked up and smiled at her mouthing “It’s fine”. She smiled back at me with a look of relief on her face, giving me a thumbs up. Suddenly, this girl who had been the devil’s right hand in my mind a day ago, was a nice, well intended person who, just like me, was trying her best to get through the challenges of the course.

I can’t tell you how fortunate I was to have experienced this during my course and have the opportunity to address this thinking that had been weighing me down for so long. Now I’m back in the real world, I’m applying these lessons and making new observations every day. Rick and I have great conversations about behaviors and emotions that we’re noticing that were too subtle to realize before our training. We’re definitely able to process our emotions and thoughts so much more effectively. We are able to be present and have become better versions of ourselves because of it.

New friends
New friends

Day 10 was a special day where we were allowed to talk to our fellow students. It was a really interesting day, learning about people that we had been living, eating and sitting with for 9 days in complete silence. You inadvertently make up stories about who they are and what they do simply from observing some physical attribute about them or some physical action they have made. How wrong we can be about people. It’s an interesting exercise in perception. The girl who sat in front of me in the hall turned out to be more like me than I could have imagined. My teacher was right. We are now friends.

The journey is so different for everyone that experiences the course that I can’t tell you what the experience will be like for you, and it would be remiss of me to try to explain the method to you, simply because I don’t have the training to do it, and to teach it incorrectly would be an injustice to you. I can only recommend the course whole heartedly no matter what walk of life you’re on.

The course is 100% free and everything is provided for you. Just bring bedding, towel, toiletries and enough clothes to last 10 days. No laundry services are provided but you can hand wash and hang your clothes outside. There’s no obligation to donate money at the end. They actually encourage service over payment to help you grow spiritually. The center staff are all volunteers who have taken the course, and no one, including the teachers are getting paid a penny. Even the facilities are provided as donations in money and time by skilled workers. You can  sign up for amazonSmile to have a portion of the money you pay for goods bought on amazon go to your Vipassana center, at no cost to you.

I can tell you that we are now strong practitioners of this meditation method and will most likely return to do the course again.  If you have any questions about the Vipassana course, I would be happy to respond if I can. If you have questions about the practice, there’s lots of information on their site about the theory, practice and history of Vipassana, and I recommend you check it out.

If you’re at all interested in enlightenment, happiness, brain training, or meditation for mental or physical reasons, this course is the real deal. The course has given me the tools to deal with anxiety, depression, attachment, anger, and also to more fully experience happiness and love.

My life has become so much more vivid since finding Vipassana. I am so grateful for the experience and wholeheartedly recommend giving it a go.

Vipassana Meditation – Part Two: Rules for Faith & Practice:

Faith:

In this part of my report on Vipassana, I’m focusing on religion. Talking to friends about the course, it is easy to see the apprehension of others in deciding whether or not Vipassana is for them. Most conventionally religious individuals are unsure of trying such a practice, not wanting to interfere with their beliefs or other daily religious practice.

The Vipassana website describes the practice in full. Here is the first paragraph to give you an idea. Check out the site to read more about the history:

“Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India’s most ancient techniques of meditation. It was rediscovered by Gautama Buddha more than 2500 years ago and was taught by him as a universal remedy for universal ills, i.e., an Art Of Living. This non-sectarian technique aims for the total eradication of mental impurities and the resultant highest happiness of full liberation.”

Emphasis should be made on the term “non-sectarian”. The roots of this practice have been passed down from Buddha…. But let’s be clear for those who may not know. Buddha is not a God. A Buddha is a human-being who has reached enlightenment. Gautama was not the first nor the last man to achieve this feat. There are branches of Buddhism that promote God/deity worship and types of meditation that have been adapted from the pure Vipassana practice to include prayer, chanting, objects of visual focus and mental markers to focus the mind. Vipassana is none of these things. It is the plain and simple physical practice of meditation without such distractions, allowing observation of one’s own body and thoughts.

Vipassana centers do not expect you to convert to Buddhism or denounce your current faith to practice, and they don’t turn away anyone because of faith. But they do ask you to put aside religious practice of any kind when you come to the center in order to experience the benefits of Vipassana, as well as not to distract others. If your mind is distracted with prayer, worship and faith, you will never fully experience the benefits of the course. On completion of the course, teachers help those with faiths to incorporate their new found practice in a way that isn’t counterproductive.

Goenka also is very clear at the end of the course to mention that it is not imperative for you to believe in everything he has taught during the course. It is for you to take away the parts of the teachings that resonate and work for you. It’s up to you to decide how far you want to dive into the deeper teachings. There’s no pressure or commitment, no obligation whatsoever … but in giving the course a fair trial, I found that 99% of the teachings have given me the tools I need to evolve my mind/brain continually from now on. I can’t express how valuable the course has been to me personally, and to my partner.

Vipassana’s Strict Rules:

The rules are in place to help you and everyone else reach their fullest potential on the course. You can find a full list of the rules on the Vipassana site including special vows called Precepts that one must commit to at the start of the course, but in short, here are some of the bigger rules from my perspective:

  • You MUST stay the full 10 days.
  • You must put aside all religious practices & prayer for the 10 days.
  • You must not wear religious paraphernalia.
  • You must not lie, steal, kill or engage in sexual misconduct during your stay.
  • Men and women must remain separated at all times, and have their own sides of the center to conduct practice, eat, walk, etc. A male and female teacher is assigned for each.
  • Students must wear modest and comfortable clothing. No revealing or tight fitting garments, including shorts, leggings or tank tops.
  • No talking, no physical contact, no eye contact with any individual during your time at the center. You can only talk to the teacher during set interview times to ask short and on topic questions about the practice. You can also talk to the male or female manager that presides over the residences for the course should there be any issues.
  • No phones, internet, writing, reading, drawing, taking photos, listening or playing music. Emergency contact info is available for you to be reached by loved ones while you’re there.
  • You must eat the vegetarian cuisine provided and only eat during set meal times at 6.30am and 11am. A snack of fruit and tea is given at 5pm for new students, but old student repeating the course are encouraged to forego this extra snack. The only exceptions are for medical necessity.

As a grown adult, some of these rules seem a little extreme, but about half way through the course I started appreciating how important they were to allowing everyone to focus without distraction. Silence and being left to one’s own thoughts really forces you to address your feelings without reacting to them. Having no entertainment to distract my mind, I was able to focus 100% on being present and experiencing my emotions as they happened, observe them in silence, and understand myself.

On the last day, we were allowed to talk to everyone, and immediately meditation sessions became much more challenging to get into. My mind became filled with thoughts and emotions about conversations I had just had and what they meant in terms of my present and past. Just interacting with people provided a distraction large enough to split my focus during meditation that I know I would not have been able to get past earlier in my training.

In the final installment of this three-part report, I will talk more about my experience, and specifically the 29 Palms location I attended.

In short though, if the rules of Vipassana concern you, I urge you to consider that the course is only ten days long, and there’s nothing you can’t be without for 10 days that isn’t provided on the course. God and your church will still be there when you’re done. Your job, worries, family and friends will all still be there in 10 days, but you’ll just be better at dealing with them when you get done.

If money or time are an issue, consider doing Vipassana instead of going on vacation. For my partner and I, the course gave us a refresh that no cruise or tropical vacation has ever done. Not only did it recharge us, but it gave us the tools to continually top up that charge indefinitely. The course was free and donating at the end isn’t required. There isn’t even a weird uncomfortable request for donations leaving you feeling like a douche at the end. They spend more time encouraging you to come back and get more benefits than they do on trying to get you to donate. There’s no catch, no further commitment, no expectation of further involvement or obligation.

Vipassana has been a life saver for me. I had begun to think there was nothing out there that was truly altruistic, gave tangible results and could make an actual difference in my life. I can’t express to you how thankful I am to have found Vipassana and to also have discovered it with my partner. Finding this technique together has been so much easier to maintain than it would have been if only one of us had taken the course. We are able to discuss our experience and thoughts about it all and support each other in keeping up our daily meditation. It means a lot to our relationship to have been able to share the experience together.

Vipassana works well if everyone in the family practices it. The course encourages families and couples to do the courses together, even though they separate men, women and children. Children actually have their own special course separate of the adult course. At the end of the course I spoke to several participants who told me they had done the course many times before, some of them as children. It seems that with each time you take the course, you get something new out of it, no matter how far down the path of enlightenment you are.

Vipassana Meditation – Part One: How the course benefited me:

Six months ago in frustration, I posted on Facebook to all my friends, “Does anyone know of a retreat that teaches meditation without religion that isn’t an over-priced relaxation spa?” To my surprise and delight, two acquaintances responded, “Vipassana”. That was all it took. I started researching it immediately and soon had secured 2 spots on the Vipassana meditation course in Twenty-nine Palms, CA. It’s the best thing I’ve ever done for myself.

My partner Rick and I completed the 10-day New Student course. For the first time in my years meditating and seeking some level of enlightenment, happiness and contentment, I can finally say I have found a practice that yields physical and mental results that last beyond the practice session itself. I’m truly amazed at how simple and powerful Vipassana meditation is and am recommending it to anyone and everyone that will humor my discourse on the subject. Let me tell you more…..

Vipassana Center, Twentynine Palms, CA
Vipassana Center, Twentynine Palms, CA

For myself, I have been drawn to meditation as a way to curb my fierce type A personality, filled with fire, anger, frustration and impatience. For my partner, he has been drawn to meditation to alleviate his chronic anxiety issues for which he takes a couple of different prescribed meds. In the past, various meditation practices have helped us to find clarity and peace of mind during the actual practice itself. This has been a welcomed break from the constant barrage of thoughts, emotions and psychosomatic symptoms that manifest from mental stress.

I don’t know what I expected to happen on the Vipassana course, but I’m delighted to tell you that both Rick and I experienced a level of lasting clarity, calmness and contentment through learning this practice. Our physicality has also reaped immense benefits from it. Rick hasn’t needed to take his prescribed meds since coming off them on the course. He’s also stopped biting his nails, which he has done for about 30 years incessantly. His mind is clearer than ever. I am so much calmer than before, so much so, that a stress hump between my shoulder blades has almost disappeared. We’re working more efficiently than before, with much more focus, and we are enjoying our free time with more presence, making every moment much more intense and vivid.

The course gives guidelines to practice after leaving the center, and we’re trying hard to incorporate the recommended hour in the morning and hour in the evening every day to maintain the benefits and progress even further with our practice.

We have both had huge revelations about various issues in our lives that manifested during our time at the center. According to the practice, these are called Sankharas and are deeply carved scars that cause aversion or attachment. These lead to unwanted emotions that cause pain and suffering. Through Vipassana practice, these issues come to light for each individual and one is able to subjectively deal with them. It seems that for Rick and I, our most prevalent issues surfaced incredibly fast and resolved themselves, lifting a weight from our shoulders. Through deeper and consistent practice, other sankharas continue to present themselves from the depths of our psyches. Clearing all one’s sankharas is part of the goal of the practice, since one cannot become enlightened if one still has aversions and attachments or cravings.

S.N.Goenka
S.N.Goenka

Vipassana new students HAVE to take a 10-day course to begin practicing. It’s like bootcamp, a crash course or as Goenka, the teacher calls it, “Vipassana Kindergarten”. One can only really get the benefits from immersion in this way. After you have done the 10-day course, you’re allowed to take 1 day, 2-day, or even 40-day courses if you wish. There are also meditation groups and workshops, but without the basic understanding you get from the 10-day course, it would be difficult to get any benefit from just these sessions alone.

I can only equate the experience to something like visiting the Grand Canyon for the first time. You’ve seen pictures, you’ve read the details about how vast it is, and you’ve watched footage of aircraft flying around its immense depths… but there’s nothing like walking up to the edge yourself and seeing it with your own eyes. I remember seeing it for the first time and thinking “Wow, I knew it was going to be big, but crap, I didn’t realize just how immense it would be now that I’m here looking at it.”

I’ve read many books on meditation, I’ve practiced under various masters and gurus who claim to have some level of enlightenment and wisdom to offer me. But I always felt that there was a level of mysticism involved in enlightenment that made it somewhat unattainable and magical. All of the tools that I was given to help me meditate became automated processes that I went through in hopes that somehow, one day, the light of wisdom would eventually pierce through the veil of emotions and thoughts that plagued my mind. With Vipassana, by the fifth day of the course, without any mysticism, only practical and tangible instructions, I started feeling incredibly in tune with my body and emotions. Deep issues started to surface. With help from my teacher and understanding of the practice I was able to work through and address them. I had many “oh wow” moments like this. Moments when everything suddenly seemed to make sense, and I finally thought to myself “So THIS is how it’s supposed to feel”. I finally understood through experience.

I also know now that this is why it is so important to commit fully to the course and the strict rules of which I will go into in Part 2 of my report. Without full commitment, you can’t experience that “Wow” moment where everything clicks and you finally understand the goal and the way to get there.

I highly recommend checking out the links I’ve provided in this post that give you more information about Vipassana and the location I went to. The organization has many venues where you can take the course, all over the world. Check it out for a location near you.

Out with the old and in with the new!

Happy Chinese New Year!

This week is the turn of the Chinese Calendar Year, and it is now the Year of the Rabbit. This is my birth year. To welcome it in, we’ve been organizing and cleaning our house, office and studio. Everything is now organized and clear for us to think and work with focus and clarity. It’s amazing how just organizing your closets, and cleaning those usually neglected shelves and cupboards can give you a renewed energy to focus and work. I’ve done everything from overhauling my art studio, to preparing my taxes ahead of deadline. I’ve also rewritten my entire Kung Fu personal notebook, full of meditation, practice, Qi Gong and Tai Chi notes, and in doing so, got to revisit the teachings again.

We’ve done all this in the past few weeks, and it’s really been a great help towards better focusing our work projects, which is also helping us create more personal time. I highly recommend doing it.

I’ve also made a resolution with my sister to learn Mandarin. I find learning languages difficult, and of all languages, Mandarin is one of the harder ones to master. However,  I’ve decided that learning this language will be a perfect way to stretch my mind and help me understand the culture of my ancestors.

The Dalai Lama in San Jose – Talking about the 8 Verses for Training the Mind

This week we went to see the Dalai Lama talk at the San Jose Convention Center. It was an amazing experience and rare opportunity that I will never forget. His website features images from the event that you can see here. He talked about the 8 Verses for Training the Mind, but didn’t really elaborate on the verses’ text much, instead choosing to talk about religious tolerance and compassion in general quite a bit before going over the verses and their relevance. It was all related though, as everything ultimately is. He spoke mostly in English, but had an interpreter there for when he had trouble explaining his thoughts, and also to translate his teachings about the verses. I was really impressed with how much English he actually did speak….and also at his sense of humor. He cracked jokes frequently and laughed quite heartily at them too. Saying things like, ‘normally, we should now  chant and meditate, but there’s no time, so today, it’s not necessary’, then picking up a sun visor and pointing at the spot lights on the stage, says ‘this hat….necessary’. The way he said it was very cute and everyone chuckled 🙂

We arrived at the convention center at around 10am to line up for the event and were lucky enough to be the first to be seated in our designated section. We were about 30 rows from the stage, behind the reserved area for Buddhist groups, who had preferential seating. So we ended up getting great seats, with a huge gang-way between us and the rows in front. The Dalai Lama made his way to the stage at around 2pm to address the room of approx. 12,000 people. I’ve never heard 12,000 people make so little noise. It was a deafening silence in respect of his presence. At this moment I was over-whelmed and welled up with tears of awe and respect. I’ve never felt that before in this way. It was really something.

The entire room rose for his entrance. He walked up to the fr0nt of the stage passing several monks and acknowledging them as he went. Then he turned to his bowing audience, placed his hands in prayer and bowed right back at us. We all stooped a little lower in our bows, while trying to look up to see him at the same time. He smiled generously at us all. Even with the powerful energy of his presence, his humble demeanor still shone through. He really does embody the lessons that he teaches.

It was something to see the diversity of the 12,000 people there to see him too. I saw many robed religious figures to include Christian Priests, Hindus, Sikhs and Jewish practitioners.  All there, proud of their own religions, but open and respectful to the words and teachings of  The Dalai Lama. How refreshing and wonderful is that! I wish this was more the norm and less of an anomaly.

At the end of his teachings, we all got to recite in unison the 8 verses along with him. I’m copying them here for you in case you don’t know them. Their message is about compassion, living with out anxiety and anger, but instead acceptance of others and love for others even if those others show you less in return. Taking negative emotions and using them as positive lessons to clear your mind of unproductive thoughts and feelings:

  1. With a determination to achieve the highest aim, For the benefit of all sentient beings, Which surpasses even the wish-fulfilling gem, May I hold them dear at all times.
  2. Whenever I interact with someone, May I view myself as the lowest amongst all, And, from the very depths of my heart, Respectfully hold others as superior.
  3. In all my deeds may I probe into my mind, And as soon as mental and emotional afflictions arise – As they endanger myself or others – May I strongly confront and avert them.
  4. When I see beings of unpleasant character, Oppressed by strong negativity and suffering, May I hold them dear – for they are rare to find – As if I have discovered a jewel treasure!
  5. When others, out of jealousy, Treat me wrongly with abuse, slander, and scorn, May I take upon myself the defeat And offer to others the victory.
  6. When someone whom I have helped, Or in whom I have placed great hopes, Mistreats me in extremely hurtful ways, May I regard him still as my precious teacher.
  7. In brief, may I offer benefit and joy t all my mothers, both directly and indirectly, May I quietly take upon myself All hurts and pains of my mothers.
  8. May all this remain undefiled By the stains of the eight mundane concerns; And may I, recognizing all things as illusion, Devoid of clinging, be released from bondage.

Unmistaken Child (Ha-Gilgul)

Just watched a documentary called ‘Unmistaken Child (Ha-Gilgul)’, a film by Nati Baratz about the journey of Tibetan Buddhist monk Tenzin Zopa as he traveled around looking  to identify the child who was the reincarnation of his deceased master, Lama Konchog. It’s an interesting insight in to this monk’s life and feelings for his master, as well as the eventual identification of the new Rinpoche. It was very interesting watching this young boy know his past life…..sometimes acting like a mature monk in a child’s body, sometimes, just acting like a child. I wonder what must be going on inside his head.

I recommend this film highly, if anything to help you understand the process of recognizing a reincarnated Rinpoche (Precious One) and get a glimpse in to the real world of a Tibetian Monk. Two thumbs up from me.

This documentary is currently a Instant Play on Netflix, so check it out!

More Dalai Lama

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has added a date to his visit in October, stopping to talk at Stanford on Oct 14th. I’m planning to attend his talk  on Oct 12th, so I’m keeping a close eye on this extra event in case I can’t get tickets for the other. Here’s the link to find out more. Tickets are not yet available for either date, but you can subscribe to the newsletter for the organization running the event to find out as soon as they’re up for grabs.

Teachings from the Dalai Lama

His Holiness the Dalai Lama talked to Ann Curry on NBC the other day. Check it out.

I learned something of course!

I’ve been feeling very dejected about the general state of human kind recently. I’ve been sad that so many people are ready to fight, kill and show aggression towards each other with so little stimulus. Not just between countries at war, but between fellow citizens, neighbors, children, teachers. I’ve felt like we’ve learned nothing from the atrocities of our recorded history and continue to repeat the same mistakes continually, even making them greater mistakes with our technology these days.

I haven’t known how to deal with this, but His Holiness had an answer. When Ann Curry asked him about the same thing, he explained that he felt human kind was not getting worse, but actually improving. He saw the good in the midst of everything bad that happens in this world. He said that 100 yrs ago, when a natural disaster happened, no one from neighboring countries gave a hand in relief. Now, countries flock to the scene to bring aid from great distances.

Being less enlightened than His Holiness, I still see far more damage than good done all over the world. But the lesson he brings me, is to FIND the good and focus on it. To nurture it, so it will grow. To not give up on it. All this time my focus has been on just how awful stuff is and it has been leaving me with a feeling of helplessness, which has been depressing, not to mention anti-productive…like banging my head against a brick wall constantly interjecting about how much it hurts, but doing it anyway. Now I must change my thinking to align with His Holiness. Focus on the positive, see the good and I will have more compassion for my fellow man, as well as find more peace inside myself. I see this now. It’s like acknowledging negative forces actually makes them stronger, so it’s better to try and focus on the positive and build strength there. In this way, I can be more helpful, not to mention more content inside.

As someone that studies the teachings of Buddhism regularly, it’s not like I haven’t come across this theory before. But reading it and doing it are indeed different beasts. The Dalai Lama leads by example. Despite knowing better, my bad habits and emotions had led the way. I needed a beacon to show me where to go. I’m sure I will veer off course many times in this way in the future, but as long as I can continue to notice it and correct it, I will still move forward on my path.

Thank you your Holiness 🙂

Buddhist Retreat in Thailand

I’m very excited that the universe keeps moving me towards Buddhism and doing things to help bring enlightenment, peace and happiness to others.

Firstly, my childhood buddy Marcel has just bought a piece of land in Thailand to build a Buddhist retreat. Construction starts early next year. He plans to make it a place for people to visit for free to meditate and find themselves. I’ve volunteered to go out there and help him with the construction when the time comes.

Secondly, Sifu and I have been busy developing our business plan to produce and sell oriental ointments that she formulates. We use them all the time at the dojo, and a lot of oriental families have their own recipes handed down over generations for different remedies. We’re hoping to bring the benefits of these ointments to people of the West. We’re not sure if it will be a huge flop or a great success, but we’re willing to give it a try and see what happens.

Thirdly, my good friend and work associate Steve, has been sculpting a Buddha which is really cute and is going to sell it on my dharmarama site once I have it up and running. He’s been sculpting intricate pieces of jewelry too and after chatting with me tonight, he’s going to add more Buddhist pieces to the collection. I’m really looking forward to seeing what he does with the ideas we brainstormed 🙂

Now all I have to do is work on my collection of mandala paintings.